La presentazione è in caricamento. Aspetta per favore

La presentazione è in caricamento. Aspetta per favore

Do interpreters take advantage from exploiting perceptual illusions? Sebastiano Lava Conservatorio della Svizzera italiana, A.a. 2007-2008 Dispense.

Presentazioni simili


Presentazione sul tema: "Do interpreters take advantage from exploiting perceptual illusions? Sebastiano Lava Conservatorio della Svizzera italiana, A.a. 2007-2008 Dispense."— Transcript della presentazione:

1 Do interpreters take advantage from exploiting perceptual illusions? Sebastiano Lava Conservatorio della Svizzera italiana, A.a Dispense

2 Indice (del lavoro) 1.Introduzione 2.Nota introduttiva sulle riflessioni di H. Schenker 3.Proposte di Schenker 4.Esperimenti 5.Sistema nervoso centrale umano, struttura base 6.Percezione a) Percezione uditiva b) Percezione ottica ed illusioni ottiche 7.Integrazione proposte di Schenker – funzionamento del cervello a) quanto proposto da H. Schenker è plausibile? b) è possibile avanzare delle ipotesi di spiegazione? 8.Conclusioni

3 Introduzione Perché questo lavoro? Interesse Storia e struttura di questo lavoro, le quattro tappe

4 Struttura della presentazione I parte: Riflessioni iniziali (cap. 2) II parte: Le proposte di Schenker (cap. 3) III parte: Meccanismi percettivi (cap. 6.b) + 7.a) ) IV parte: Ipotesi di spiegazione e conclusione (cap. 7.b) + 8.)

5 I parte Riflessioni iniziali

6 Riflessioni iniziali, prima considerazione Il problema interpretativo: quale via porta alla soluzione, quale via percorrere? Plausibilità e ragionevolezza di ciò: « stadi » di un’opera d’arte musciale

7 Riflessioni iniziali I Scrivere impone di organizzare il proprio pensiero in forma nuova (prima trasformazione) 2.Esecuzione e scelte interpretative (seconda trasformazione) 3.Ascolto (terza trasformazione)

8 Riflessioni iniziali I Scrivere impone di organizzare il proprio pensiero in forma nuova (prima trasformazione) 1.Vantaggio o svantaggio dello scrivere? 2.Nel caso della musica: sacrificare l’idea o occasione per maturare artisticamente e spunto per nuove idee? 2.Esecuzione e scelte interpretative (seconda trasformazione) 3.Ascolto (terza trasformazione)

9 Riflessioni iniziali I - 3 Conseguenza notation desired effect“the mode of notation can be understood only from the point of view of the desired effect. A literal interpretation robs one of the very means leading to that effect.” (Heinrich Schenker, The art of performance, Oxford university press; New York, 2000; p. 5) synthesisDove è da cercare e dove è da trovare l’opera d’arte? Concetto di “synthesis”. oganic unity –“synthesis’ is Schenker’s term for his concept of oganic unity, i.e., the idea of a work of art in which every part is organically related, supported by a single unifying background structure” (Heinrich Schenker, The art of performance, Oxford university press; New York, 2000; p. 20 (Translator’s note) )

10 Riflessioni iniziali II: seconda considerazione Rispetto per il compositore –(ricerca del significato profondo, originale ed originario dell’opera) Rispetto per l’esecutore –(libertà interpretativa e necessità di indipendenza)

11 Riflessioni iniziali II – 2: citazioni most fateful error notation is considered the unalterable will of the composer, to be interpreted literally search for the meaning behind the symbolsneglected, largely because of the difficulty does not indicate his directions for the performance but, in a far more profound sense, represents the effect he wishes to attain What must be regared as the most fateful error in the performance of a musical work of art is the general view on the meaning of a composer’s mode of notation. That which is decreed in the notation is considered the unalterable will of the composer, to be interpreted literally. Already the mere fact that our notation hardly represents more than neumes should lead the performer to search for the meaning behind the symbols. This is neglected, largely because of the difficulty of understanding the composer’s intention. […] One would realize that the author’s mode of notation does not indicate his directions for the performance but, in a far more profound sense, represents the effect he wishes to attain. These are two separate things.” (Heinrich Schenker, The art of performance, Oxford university press; New York, 2000; p. 5)

12 Riflessioni iniziali II – 3: citazioni In the end, what matters is the ability to hear and evaluate all the effects of one’s own playing.” (Heinrich Schenker, The art of performance, Oxford university press; New York, 2000; p. 78) “their music is performed correctly only if it is played with utmost freedom” (Heinrich Schenker, The art of performance, Oxford university press; New York, 2000, p. 70) “a nonrhetorical performance […] is no performance at all” (Heinrich Schenker, The art of performance, Oxford university press; New York, 2000, p. 70)

13 Riflessioni iniziali II – 4: citazioni fully aware of the desired effect conviction Only if the performer is fully aware of the desired effect will he be able to convey it. This effect then serves to justify any means he might use to produce it. The psychology of this fact is so compelling that even mistakenly desired effects become tolerable when the performer conveys them with awareness and conviction. Only that result which the player produces involuntarily, with no notion of why and wherefore, is rejected.” (Heinrich Schenker, The art of performance, Oxford university press; New York, 2000; p. 78)

14 II parte Le proposte di Schenker

15 Proposte di Schenker 1.Legato 2.Nuances del tempo

16 Legato the most difficult manner of playing for the pianist 1.“Legato technique is by far the most difficult and complicated manner of playing for the pianist.” continue holding the first note 2.Sul legato “oggettivo”: “the pianist must continue holding the first note even after the d2 has been played” certain ways of dissembling can help to give an impression of legato 3.“At times certain ways of dissembling can help to give an impression of legato even where, strictly speaking, legato is impossible” impression of legato 4.“the impression of legato can be created even without actual legato playing” legato of double notes or chords 5.A proposito del “legato of double notes or chords”: “In such cases, it is entirely sufficient to use a legato fingering in the upper or, where appropriate, lower voice of the interval in question. At any rate, this “one-sided” legato will stimulate legato in all voices.”

17 Legato, esempi Pti. 3 & 4: Sostakovic, Preludi op. 34, XVII

18 Legato, esempi Pto. 5

19 Legato, esempi Pto. 5 Schumann, Phantasiestücke op. 12, IV. Grillen

20 Tempo, 1. Considerazioni generali noabsolute –“there is no such thing as an absolute allegro comodo – the content of the music alone must determine how it can serve to attain allegro comodo.” related to texture –“Tempo is also related to texture: the same piece must be executed in a different tempo depending on whether it is being played with a heavy or less heavy sound.”

21 Tempo 2, spirito del brano vs. metronomo, 1 – 0 tension must be maintained keep the piece in motion are of inner nature impulse must renew itself continually from within“One thing is essential: in a given piece, the tension must be maintained throughout. This must not result in using meter mechanically to ensure the flow of music, the means that keep the piece in motion are of inner nature, not of a superficially metric one. The impulse must renew itself continually from within.”

22 Tempo 3, libertà “A balanced tempo throughout a piece does not exclude freedom”

23 Tempo 4, disponibilità al cambiamento quarter notes weak hurryingunable to indicate 1.“…the quarter notes, given their lack of rhythmic variation, would appear rather empty and therefore weak. Thus we conclude that the desired effect requires hurrying – a requirement that notation is unable to indicate.” particular circumstances obligetempo modificationsto avoid a totally different effect all times is the object and measure 2.“It follows that there are particular circumstances in composition that oblige the performer to make tempo modifications. This is to avoid a totally different effect from that intended by him and by the composer on the listener, who at all times is the object and measure of the effect. It is precisely such dissembling that can fulfil the intended effect.” Balancecontrast of pushing ahead/holding back illusion of a strict tempo 3.“Balance is established through the contrast of pushing ahead/holding back, holding back/pushing ahead […] Such alternation results in the illusion of a strict tempo”

24 Tempo 4, disponibilità al cambiamento Esempi Pto. 2

25 Tempo 4, disponibilità al cambiamento Esempi Pto. 3

26 Tempo 4, disponibilità al cambiamento - 2 want expressive treatment 4.“…want expressive treatment; without pushing ahead – holding back, this would be impossible.” new rate of motion must be introduced as clearly as possible maintained with metronomic precision, without considering the listener It follows that a performance in the strictest tempo does not seem thus to the listener 5.“Each new rate of motion, sixteenths after eights, thirty-seconds after sixteenths, et cetera – and vice versa – must be introduced as clearly as possible. For this purpose it is necessary to play very first notes of the new rhythmic pattern a little slower than the absolute strictness of the metronome would demand. The reason for this rule, which has no exception, derives from the effect on the listener: if the tempo were maintained with metronomic precision, without considering the listener, the newly introduced motion would prevent his immediate understanding precisely because of the regularity of thempo. It is thus the listener who requires a comfortable moment’s lingering in order to comprehend the change of rhythm. If this is not provided for him by the performer, his ear cannot simply adjust; he gets the impression that the performer is rushing. It follows that a performance in the strictest tempo does not seem thus to the listener.”

27 Tempo 4, disponibilità al cambiamento - 3 hesitate to restore the regular pace but also, far more, as a contrast 6.“After the weak beat – in moving to the next strong one – one must hesitate. This slowing down serves not only to restore the regular pace but also, far more, as a contrast to the preceding rushing.” set even the tiniest part of the whole into intense vibrationthe content lives and breathes 7.“…vivid means […] seem to set even the tiniest part of the whole into intense vibration; the content, which otherwise would simply be annihilated by the pattern, lives and breathes.”

28 Tempo, disponibilità al cambiamento – 3 Esempi Pto. 6

29 Indice 4. Esperimenti (v. introduzione iniziale!) 1) Metodo, necessità 2) Realizzazione concreta 5. Sistema nervoso centrale umano 6. Percezione: a) percezione uditiva b) percezione ottica ed illusioni ottiche

30 6.a) Orecchio

31 6.a) Orecchio, 2

32 6.a) Orecchio, 3

33

34 III parte 6.b) + 7.a) = Meccanismi percettivi

35 Meccanismi percettivi 1.Introduzione 1.Fisiologia dei contrasti 2.Aspettative 1)Integrazione con altre modalità 2)Esperienze a)Prima componente: esperienze comuni b)Seconda componente: esperienze soggettive 2.Esempi di illusioni ottiche

36 Illusioni ottiche 1.Contrasti a)Sistema a centro e periferia, b/n 1)Illuminazione centro/periferia 2)Illuminazione in movimento 3)Quadrati 4)Griglia di Herrmann b)Sistema a centro e periferia, colori 1)Illuminazione centro/periferia 2)“Nachbilder” 2.Aspettative

37 Sistema a centro e periferia

38 Illuminazione centro/periferia

39 Illuminazione in movimento

40 Quadrati

41 Griglia di Herrmann

42 Griglia di Herrmann, spiegazione

43 Sistema centro periferia, visione a colori (“fotopica”)

44 Illuminazione a centro/periferia

45 “optische Nachbilder”

46 Nachbilder, spiegazione Concetto nuovo: adattazione –Def.: ad uno stimolo ripetuto o prolungato la cellula nervosa risponde in modo diminuito.

47 Nachbilder, spiegazione

48

49 Cap. 2: Aspettative

50 Aspettative

51 IV parte 7.b) + 8. = Ipotesi di spiegazione e conclusione

52 Cosa potrebbe succedere a livello dell’udito? Annotazione: musicista è un caso particolare! Spiegazione del legato Spiegazione del tempo

53 Spiegazione del legato Associazione! accentuazione timbro slancio fraseggio pedale (gesti)

54 Conclusioni Interesse di questo tipo di ricerca Avvertenza: attenzione! Natura soggettiva Conclusione 1) Proposte di Schenker 2) Riflessioni iniziali

55 Grazie per l’attenzione! Sebastiano Lava


Scaricare ppt "Do interpreters take advantage from exploiting perceptual illusions? Sebastiano Lava Conservatorio della Svizzera italiana, A.a. 2007-2008 Dispense."

Presentazioni simili


Annunci Google