La presentazione è in caricamento. Aspetta per favore

La presentazione è in caricamento. Aspetta per favore

Chapter Eighteen1 CHAPTER 3 Distribution of national income A PowerPoint  Tutorial To Accompany MACROECONOMICS, 7th. ed. N. Gregory Mankiw Tutorial written.

Presentazioni simili


Presentazione sul tema: "Chapter Eighteen1 CHAPTER 3 Distribution of national income A PowerPoint  Tutorial To Accompany MACROECONOMICS, 7th. ed. N. Gregory Mankiw Tutorial written."— Transcript della presentazione:

1 Chapter Eighteen1 CHAPTER 3 Distribution of national income A PowerPoint  Tutorial To Accompany MACROECONOMICS, 7th. ed. N. Gregory Mankiw Tutorial written by: Mannig J. Simidian,modified by meb B.A. in Economics with Distinction, Duke University M.P.A., Harvard University Kennedy School of Government M.B.A., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Sloan School of Management ®

2 Chapter Eighteen2 Given how the prices of factors of production are determined (go back to slides on production and investment …) what determines the economy’s total output/income how total income is distributed what determines the demand for goods and services how equilibrium in the goods market is achieved

3 Chapter Eighteen3

4 4 Outline of a closed economy, market-clearing model In yellow the economic agents: households, government, firms In blue the markets: of factors, of goods, and of loanable funds The green arrows are the monetary flows among the economic agents through the three different markets Supply side determination of output/income  production function factor markets (supply, demand, price)  income distribution (W, R) Demand side determinants of C, I, and G Equilibrium goods market loanable funds market

5 Chapter Eighteen5 The distribution of national income Determined by factor prices, the prices per unit that firms pay for the factors of production. Factor prices are determined by supply and demand in factor markets Supply of each factor is assumed fixed as well as aggregated production Y (until lectures on growth). The demand: the real wage (W/P) is the price of L, and in equilibrium a firm demand L until MPL=W/P, the real rental rate (R/P) is the price of K, and in equilibrium a firm demand K until MPK=R/P

6 Chapter Eighteen6 The Neoclassical Theory of Distribution states that each factor input is paid its marginal product states that each factor input is paid its marginal product accepted by most economists accepted by most economists states that each factor input is paid its marginal product states that each factor input is paid its marginal product accepted by most economists accepted by most economists

7 Chapter Eighteen7 Remember: the goal of the firm is to maximize profit. Profit is revenue minus cost: Profit = Revenue - Labor Costs - Capital Costs = P × Y-W × L -R × K To see how profit depends on the factors of production, we use production function Y = F (K, L) to substitute for Y to obtain: Profit = P × F (K, L) -W × L - R × K profit depends on P, W, R, L, and K. the competitive firm takes the product price and factor prices as given and chooses the amounts of labor and capital that maximize profit.

8 Chapter Eighteen8 When the competitive, profit-maximizing firm is deciding whether to hire an additional unit of labor, it considers how that decision would affect profits. It therefore compares the extra revenue from the increased production that results from the added labor to the extra cost of higher spending on wages. The increase in revenue from an additional unit of labor depends on two variables: the marginal product of labor MPL, and the price of the output. Because an extra unit of labor produces MPL units of output and each unit of output sells for P dollars, the extra revenue is: P × MPL. The extra cost is the nominal wage W

9 Chapter Eighteen9 Thus, the change in profit from hiring an additional unit of labor is  Profit =  Revenue -  Cost = (P × MPL) - W To maximize profit, the firm hires up to the point where the extra revenue equals the extra cost. The firm’s demand for labor is determined by P × MPL = W, or another way to express this is MPL = W/P The marginal productivity of labor (in terms of units of output) must be equal to W/P, the real wage– the payment to labor measured in units of output rather than in dollars/euro. Exactly the same condition for capital K: MPK = R/P

10 Chapter Eighteen10  Data la P F(K,L) – WL – RK, calcoliamo la produttività marginale del lavoro PML (  Y  L)  Es: K fisso =9, L da 11 a 12  Profitto da [PF(9,11)-11W-9R] a [PF(9,12)-12W-9R]   profitto in termini monetari: P[F(9,12)-F(9,11)]-W   profitto in termini reali: F(9,12)-F(9,11)-W/P =  Y  L  W/P   profitto è >0, allora per l'impresa è profittevole aumentare il lavoro domandato; se  profitto è <0, allora per l'impresa è profittevole ridurre il lavoro domandato (NB: è l'impresa che domanda lavoro)  Se  profitto = 0 allora il profitto è massimo, il beneficio marginale è pari al costo marginale

11 Chapter Eighteen11 Domanda di lavoro dell'impresa. Per un salario W/P (non controllato dall'impresa), quanto lavoro domanda l'impresa ? La quantità di lavoro domandata dell'impresa è quella che massimizza il profitto (cioè quella per cui PML(L)=W/P) Y  Y/  L, W/P LL YY L L

12 Chapter Eighteen12 L PML=W/P L Equilibrio sul mercato del lavoro PMK=R/P K K Equilibrio sul mercato dei beni capitali Offerta fissa di L? Tasso di partecipazione; qualità dei lavoratori,.... Offerta fissa di K? Miglioramento tecnologico...

13 Chapter Eighteen13 La produzione di equilibrio Funzione di produzione aggregata: Y=F(K,L) Fattori forniti in ammontare fisso: K=K e L=L Quindi Y=F(K, L) La produzione è deteminata dall'offerta aggregata (e la domanda aggregata aggiusterà ad essa – vedremo poi come). La produzione di equilibrio è quella di pieno impiego delle risorse.

14 Chapter Eighteen14 Y is both the volume of production and the distributed income. Are these two measures coherent? If the production function has the property of constant returns to scale, then economic profit is zero. This conclusion follows from Euler’s theorem, which states that if the production function has constant returns to scale, then Y = F(K,L) = (MPL × L) + (MPK × K) If each factor of production is paid its marginal product, then the sum of these factor payments equals total output. In other words, constant returns to scale, profit maximization, and competition together imply that economic profit is zero.

15 Chapter Eighteen15 The income that remains after firms have paid the factors of production is the economic profit of the firms’ owners. Real economic profit is: Economic Profit = Y - (MPL × L) - (MPK × K) or to rearrange: Y = (MPL × L) + (MPK × K) + Economic Profit. How large is economic profit? Under perfect competition with free entry/exit in/from the market, and constant return to scale the economic profit of a maximizing firm is zero. The only profit to owners of company is the remuneration to K. Total income is divided among -Total labor income = -Total capital income =

16 Chapter Eighteen16 An example by using the Cobb-Douglas Production Function Paul Douglas Paul Douglas observed that the division of national income between capital and labor has been roughly constant over time. In other words, the total income of workers and the total income of capital owners grew at almost exactly the same rate. He then wondered what conditions might lead to constant factor shares. Cobb, a mathematician, said that the production function would need to have the property that: Capital Income = MPK × K = α Y Labor Income = MPL × L = (1- α) Y

17 Chapter Eighteen17 Capital Income = MPK × K = α Y Labor Income = MPL × L = (1- α) Y Capital Income = MPK × K = α Y Labor Income = MPL × L = (1- α) Y α is a constant between zero and one and measures capital and labors’ share of income. α is a constant between zero and one and measures capital and labors’ share of income. Cobb showed that the function with this property is: F (K, L) = A K α L 1- α Cobb showed that the function with this property is: F (K, L) = A K α L 1- α A is a parameter greater than zero that measures the productivity of the available technology. A is a parameter greater than zero that measures the productivity of the available technology. Cobb-Douglas Production Function

18 Chapter Eighteen18 From the Cobb–Douglas Production function, the marginal product of labor is: MPL = (1- α) A K α L –α or, MPL = (1- α) Y / L and the marginal product of capital is: MPL = α A K α-1 L 1–α or, MPK = α Y/K Let’s now understand the way these equations work. From the Cobb–Douglas Production function, the marginal product of labor is: MPL = (1- α) A K α L –α or, MPL = (1- α) Y / L and the marginal product of capital is: MPL = α A K α-1 L 1–α or, MPK = α Y/K Let’s now understand the way these equations work.

19 Chapter Eighteen19 Properties of the Cobb–Douglas Production Function It has constant returns to scale (remember Mankiw’s Bakery of last lecture). That is, if capital and labor are increased by the same proportion, then output increases by the same proportion as well. The marginal products are: MPL = (1- α)Y/L MPK= α Y/ K The MPL is proportional to output per worker, Y/L, which is called average labor productivity, the MPK is proportional to output per unit of capital, Y/K, which is called average capital productivity. Then the marginal productivity of a factor is proportional to its average productivity.

20 Chapter Eighteen20 An increase in the amount of capital raises the MPL and reduces the MPK. An increase in the amount of labor reduces the MPL and raises the MPK. A technological innovation (A increases) proportionally raises both marginal productivities. Let’s now understand the way these equations work. An increase in the amount of capital raises the MPL and reduces the MPK. An increase in the amount of labor reduces the MPL and raises the MPK. A technological innovation (A increases) proportionally raises both marginal productivities. Let’s now understand the way these equations work.

21 Chapter Eighteen21 If the factors (K and L) earn their marginal products, then the parameter α indeed tells us how much income goes to labor and capital. The total amount paid to labor is MPL × L = (1- α). Therefore (1- α) is labor’s share of output Y. Similarly, the total amount paid to capital, MPK × K is αY and α is capital’s share of output. The ratio of labor income to capital income is a constant (1- α)/ α, just as Douglas observed. The factor shares depend only on the parameter α, not on the amounts of capital or labor or on the state of technology as measured by the parameter A.

22 Chapter Eighteen22 Despite the many changes in the economy of the last 40 years, the share of income to labor is stable around 70%. This division of income is compatible with a Cobb–Douglas production function, in which the parameter α is estimated about 0.3.

23 Chapter Eighteen23 Lavoro dipendente e autonomo. Reddito totale: reddito da lavoro+utili delle imprese. UK Office for National Statistics (Economic Trends, Annual Supplement) and US Bureau of Economic Affairs.

24 Chapter Eighteen24 La domanda aggregata Le componenti della domanda aggregata: C = domanda per beni e servizi (famiglie) I = domanda per beni di investimento (imprese) G = domanda pubblica per beni e servizi (per ora economia chiusa: no export ed import)

25 Chapter Eighteen25 Conoscete già una possibile funzione di consumo… C Y – T C (Y –T ) PMC=  C/  (Y-T) La pendenza della funzione di consumo è la PMC.  Y-T  =1

26 Chapter Eighteen26  Il consumo dipende anche (negativamente) dal tasso di interesse reale.  Perché se la remunerazione reale del mio risparmio sale (  r ), consumare “oggi” costa di più rispetto a consumare “domani” (e risparmiare oggi). Allora diminuisco il consumo oggi (C ↓) per consumare di più domani.  Quindi se r cresce le famiglie acquistano meno case (e risparmiano di più) E sapete anche che …

27 Chapter Eighteen27 r I I (r)I (r) La spesa per investimenti dipende negativamente dal tasso di interesse reale. Poi sapete che: Investimenti ( I) La funzione di investimento è I = f (r ), dove r indica il tasso di interesse reale

28 Chapter Eighteen28 Il tasso di interesse reale misura in termini reali, ossia al netto dell’inflazione:  il costo di prendere a prestito risorse, ossia il costo del denaro (=quanto costa prendere a prestito un euro)  la remunerazione del risparmio (=quanto rende il prestito); si parla di generica attività finanziaria – deposito bancario, azioni, obbligazioni; no aspetti di rischio, durata, ecc…  il costo-opportunità della liquidità o di utilizzare risorse proprie per finanziare investimenti (=se finanzio un nuovo capannone con gli utili degli anni scorsi, quali sono gli utilizzi reali alternativi a cui rinuncio?)  r   I

29 Chapter Eighteen29 Perché ragioniamo in termini di tasso d’interesse reale  E’ il tasso d'interesse nominale al netto del tasso di inflazione  Supponiamo che prestiamo 100E oggi al tasso dell’8%. Domani saremo più ricchi di 8E (cioè avremo l’8% in più di 100E) solo se con 8E possiamo comprare ciò che compriamo oggi, ossia solo se il potere di acquisto di 8E non muta.  Se l’inflazione fosse del 5%, in realtà il nostro potere di acquisto sarebbe solo pari al 3% di 100E ossia a 3E in più.

30 Chapter Eighteen30  Se presto oggi 1kg di grano il cui prezzo corrente e futuro è 20E/kg, tra un anno avrò 1,08kg di grano   tasso d'interesse reale: (1,08-1)/1=0,08 cioè r = 8%  In termini monetari tra un anno avrò 1,08kg·20E = 21,6 E   tasso d’interesse nominale: (21,6-20)/20=0,08 cioè i = 8%

31 Chapter Eighteen31  Ma se il prezzo corrente è 20 E/kg ed il prezzo (atteso) tra un anno è 21 E/kg   inflazione: (21-20)/20=0,05 cioè il 5% all'anno  Con l'inflazione, per avere l'8% d'interesse in termini di grano devo chiedere un tasso nominale pari alla somma del tasso reale r e dell'inflazione (attesa)  cioè devo tenere conto della perdita di valore della moneta nel tempo.  Se , r = 8% allora i = 13% e tra un anno otterrò 22,6 E.   tasso d’interesse nominale: (22,6-20)/20=0,13  NB: se stipulassi il prestito all'8%, tra un anno avrei 21,6 E. Ma con 21,6 E comprerei solo 21,6/21≈1,03 Kg (infatti manca il 5% dell'inflazione)

32 Chapter Eighteen32 Equazione di Irving Fisher Il tasso d'interesse nominale: i ≈ r +  The Fisher effect refers to a one-to-one adjustment of the nominal interest rate to the inflation rate. According to the Fisher effect, when the rate of inflation rises, the nominal interest rate rises by the same amount. The real interest rate stays the same.

33 Chapter Eighteen33 The Nominal Interest Rate and the Inflation Rate in UK (Bank of England and UK Office for National Statistics) Copyright © 2004 South-Western Percent (per year) Inflation Nominal interest rate

34 Chapter Eighteen34 We take the level of government spending and taxes as given. If G = T, the government has a balanced budget. If G > T, the government is running a budget deficit. If G < T, the government is running a budget surplus. G = G T = T

35 Chapter Eighteen35 La spesa pubblica ( G ) Definizione: Beni e servizi acquistati dalla pubblica amministrazione. Esempi: Infrastrutture, dipendenti pubblici, spesa militare, polizia. Esclude le spese per ridistribuzione e trasferimenti (sussidi di disoccupazione, pensioni) in quanto non rappresentano produzione di nuova ricchezza, ma soldi dati a consumatori e imprese che,a loro volta, possono usarli per comprare beni e servizi. Non sono acquisti diretti da parte del settore pubblico.

36 Chapter Eighteen36 Esempio “Il bilancio della Repubblica italiana nel 2012 registrava spese complessive per 801,08 miliardi di euro. Questa è la spesa pubblica in Italia”. La spesa pubblica è solo una quota degli 801 miliardi. Occorre togliere le prestazioni sociali (311,41 m.), gli interessi passivi (86,71 m.), i trasferimenti alle imprese (18,59 m.) e gli investimenti pubblici (29,22 m.). Rimangono 355,15 m. per acquisti di beni e servizi della pubblica amministrazione. E’ questa la “spesa pubblica”. Spese dello Stato = G + TR + interessi passivi Macroeconomia - Prof. ME Bontempi 36

37 Chapter Eighteen37 Cosa muove offerta e domanda aggregate all’equilibrio?  Offerta aggregata:  Domanda aggregata:  Equilibrio: Il tasso di interesse reale si muove per garantire l’equilibrio tra domanda e offerta aggregata.

38 Chapter Eighteen38 Y = C(Y - T) + I(r) + G Si noti che il tasso d’interesse reale r è la sola variabile endogena, non già determinata. Ha un ruolo chiave: deve aggiustarsi per assicurare che la domanda di beni sia uguale all’offerta. Maggiore è il tasso di interesse, minore sarà il livello di investimento e quindi la domanda di beni e servizi, C + I + G. Se il tasso di interesse è troppo alto, l’investimento è troppo basso e la domanda di output scende sotto l’offerta. Se il tasso di interesse è troppo basso, l’investimento è troppo alto e la domanda di output sale sopra l’offerta. Al tasso di interesse di equilibrio la domanda di beni e servizi uguaglia l’offerta.

39 Chapter Eighteen39 L’equilibrio nei mercati finanziari  Domanda e offerta per il settore finanziario.  Un bene: “i fondi mutuabili” (= i soldi!)  Domanda di fondi: investimenti  Offerta di fondi: risparmio  Prezzo dei fondi: tasso di interesse reale

40 Chapter Eighteen40 La domanda: Investmenti Le imprese domandano fondi per investire : si prende a prestito per finanziare macchinari, capannoni, attrezzature,ecc. Le famiglie domandano prestiti per comprare case.  Dipende negativamente da r, il “prezzo” dei fondi mutuabili (=del denaro!) (costo di prendere a prestito risorse).

41 Chapter Eighteen41 La curva di domanda di fondi r I I (r)I (r) La funzione di investimento è anche la curva di domanda di fondi mutuabili

42 Chapter Eighteen42 L’offerta di fondi mutuabili proviene dal risparmio RISPARMIO PRIVATO (Y-T-C): Le famiglie risparmiano e acquistano depositi bancari, obbligazioni o altri asset finanziari. Attraverso il sistema finanzario, questi fondi vengono utilizzati dalle imprese per fare investimenti. RISPARMIO PUBBLICO (T-G): abbiamo risparmio pubblico quando il governo non spende tutto il gettito che ottiene dalla tassazione (se il governo si indebita il risparmio è negativo) RISPARMIO NAZIONALE: S = (Y-T-C)+(T-G) = Y-C-G

43 Chapter Eighteen43 Impieghi e utilizzi del reddito Impieghi del reddito: Y = C + I +G, da cui: I = Y – C - G ma è anche S =Y – C – G per cui: S = I (NB: l'uguaglianza vale in economia chiusa) L’ammontare di investimenti aggregati che un paese può effettuare – in economia chiusa – è pari al risparmio interno che il sistema riesce a mobilitare. Se vuoi investire di più devi risparmiare di più

44 Chapter Eighteen44 La curva di offerta di fondi mutuabili r S, I In prima approssimazione, il risparmio nazionale non dipende da r. La curva di offerta di fondi è verticale.

45 Chapter Eighteen45 Equilibrio sui mercati finanziari r S, I I (r )I (r ) Tasso di interesse reale di equilibrio Livello d’equilibrio degli investimenti

46 Chapter Eighteen46 Il ruolo speciale di r r si aggiusta in modo da portare in equilibrio sia il mercato dei beni/servizi che i mercati finanziari: Se il mercato finanziario è in equilibrio: Y – C – G = I Aggiungiamo ( C + G ) a entrambi i lati: Y = C + I + G Quindi, r si aggiusta in modo da portare in equilibrio sia il mercato dei beni/servizi che i mercati finanziari: Se il mercato finanziario è in equilibrio: Y – C – G = I Aggiungiamo ( C + G ) a entrambi i lati: Y = C + I + G Quindi, Equilibrio nel mercato finanziario Equilibrio nel mercato dei beni/servizi

47 Chapter Eighteen47 Un incremento della spesa pubblica: Se la spesa pubblica aumenta di un ammontare pari a  G, l’effetto immediato è quello di un aumento della domanda di beni e servizi pari a  G. Dato che l’output totale è fisso l’incremento della spesa pubblica richiede la riduzione di qualche componente della domanda. Dato che il reddito disponibile Y-T è invariato, il consumo non cambia. L’incremento di spesa pubblica deve essere “compensato” da una diminuzione dell’investimento di uguale ammontare. Per indurre l’investimento a scendere, il tasso d’interesse deve SALIRE. L’incremento di spesa pubblica comporta un aumento di r ed un calo di I  Effetto di spiazzamento (crowding out) della spesa pubblica sull’investimento.

48 Chapter Eighteen48 Crowding out r S, I I (r )I (r ) Se G↑, S↓, r↑ in modo che I↓, riportando l'equilibrio sul mercato dei fondi mutuabili ←

49 Chapter Eighteen49 Una diminuzione delle imposte: L’effetto di impatto di un taglio fiscale è quello di aumentare il reddito disponibile e quindi di aumentare il consumo. Il reddito disponibile aumenta di  T, ed ilconsumo aumenta di un ammontare pari al prodotto tra  T e la PMC (o MPC in inglese). Tanto più alta è la propensione marginale a consumare, quanto più elevato è l’impatto della riduzione delle imposte sul consumo. Al pari di un incremento della spesa pubblica, anche la riduzione delle imposte SPIAZZA gli investimenti perchè provoca un incremento del tasso di interesse.

50 Chapter Eighteen50 Notation:  = change in a variable For any variable X,  X = “the change in X ”  is the Greek (uppercase) letter Delta Remember (Euler equation) Y = F(L,K) = (MPL×L) + (MPK×K) If  L = 1 and  K = 0, then  Y = MPL. More generally, if  K = 0, then  (Y  T ) =  Y   T, so  C = MPC  (  Y   T ) = MPC  Y  MPC  T

51 Chapter Eighteen51 EXERCISE: Suppose MPC = 0.8 and MPL = 20. For each of the following, compute the change in saving  S a.  G = 100 b.  T = 100 c.  Y = 100 d.  L = 10

52 Chapter Eighteen52 Answers (  G = 100) (  T = 100) (  Y = 100) (  L = 10)

53 Chapter Eighteen53 An increase in the demand for investment goods shifts the investment schedule to the right. At any given interest rate, the amount of investment is greater. The equilibrium moves from A to B. Because the amount of saving is fixed, the increase in investment demand raises the interest rate while leaving the equilibrium amount of investment unchanged. Now let’s see what happens to the interest rate and saving when saving depends on the interest rate (upward-sloping saving (S) curve). Investment, Saving, I, S I1I1 Real interest rate, r Saving, S S I2I2 A B

54 Chapter Eighteen54 When consumption is negatively related to the interest rate (Fisher’s model, for example) and saving is positively related to r, as shown by the upward-sloping S(r) curve, a rightward shift in the investment schedule I(r), increases the interest rate and the amount of investment. The higher interest rate induces people to increase saving, which in turn allows investment to increase. Investment, Saving, I, S I1I1 Real interest rate, r S(r) I2I2 A B Upward-sloping savings

55 Chapter Eighteen55 Let’s review some of the simplifying assumptions we have made in this chapter. In the following chapters we relax some of these assumptions to address a greater range of questions. We have: ignored the role of money, assumed no international trade, the labor force is fully employed, the capital stock, the labor force, and the production technology are fixed and ignored the role of short-run sticky prices.

56 Chapter Eighteen56 The model presented in this chapter represents the economy’s financial system with a single market– the market for loanable funds. Those who have some income they don’t want to consume immediately bring their saving to this market. Those who have investment projects they want to undertake finance them by borrowing in this market. The interest rate adjusts to bring saving and investment into balance. The actual financial system is a bit more complicated than this description. As in this model, the goal of the system is to channel resources from savers into various forms of investment. Two important markets are those of bonds and stocks. Raising investment funds by issuing bonds is called debt finance, and raising funds by issuing stock is called equity finance. Another part of the financial markets is the set of financial intermediaries (i.e. banks, mutual funds, pension funds, and insurance companies) through which households can indirectly provide resources for investment. In Chapter 11, we’ll address more fully the financial system.. But, as a building block for further analysis, representing the entire financial system by a single market for loanable funds is a useful simplification.

57 Chapter Eighteen57 LA CRISI FINANZIARIA DEL 2007  La crisi finanziaria del 2007 (che poi ha causato quelle successive…..la crisi economica, la crisi dei debiti sovrani, la crisi dell’euro) ha ricordato che il ruolo dei mercati finanziari (e in generale, della stabilità finanziaria) era stato troppo trascurato, poiché si faceva eccessivo affidamento all’ipotesi dei mercati efficienti (Fama, 1970).

58 Chapter Eighteen58  Essa prevede che un mercato sia efficiente quando i prezzi dei titoli rispecchino sempre e pienamente tutte le informazioni razionali disponibili.  In particolare:  A) efficienza in forma debole: i prezzi di mercato riflettono tutte le informazioni contenute nella serie storica dei prezzi --> le variazioni di prezzo non sono prevedibili  B) efficienza in forma semi-forte: i prezzi di mercato riflettono le informazioni contenute nella serie storica dei prezzi, e qualsiasi altra informazione di pubblico dominio.  C) efficienza in forma forte: i prezzi di mercato riflettono le informazioni contenute nella serie storica dei prezzi e qualsiasi altra informazione pubblica e/o privata (quindi anche eventuali informazioni detenute unicamente da un solo investitore o da un gruppo di investitori)

59 Chapter Eighteen59  Quindi, se si crede che i mercati finanziari siano “mercati efficienti”, non occorre preoccuparsi quando i prezzi di un asset finanziario (un’azione, un’obbligazione, un Bot) sono troppo alti o troppo bassi...il mercato riesce sempre a “prezzare” correttamente gli assets, sulla base delle informazioni disponibili e analizzate razionalmente dagli agenti economici.

60 Chapter Eighteen60 Durante gli anni Duemila ( )….  Negli USA (ma non solo) i prezzi degli immobili cominciano a salire molto (una “bolla”)  Le banche cominciarono a concedere (troppo) credito a chi acquistava un immobile (Perché era un impiego sicuro, visto che veniva usato per comprare qualcosa che sicuramente avrebbe aumentato il suo valore nel corso degli anni).  Così facendo, veniva concesso ampio credito anche a consumatori la cui affidabilità non era adeguata/primaria (i cosiddetti mutui subprime).

61 Chapter Eighteen61  Le banche sono piene di questi crediti immobiliari.  Ad un certo punto, cominciano ad usare questi crediti per moltiplicare il credito: li usano come garanzia per emettere nuovi strumenti finanziari, basati proprio sui mutui immobiliari.  Così, approfittando della scarsa regolamentazione in tal senso (in particolare l’abolizione negli anni Novanta della distinzione tra banche commerciali e banche d’investimenti, introdotta dopo la crisi del 1929), si sono costruite intere piramidi di prodotti finanziari (i cosiddetti “derivati”).  Alla base della piramide, c’erano sempre e soltanto i pagamenti dei mutui concessi.

62 Chapter Eighteen62 Il meccanismo si basava su  La convinzione che i prezzi degli immobili sarebbero continuati a crescere indefinitamente  E con essi, i prezzi degli asset finanziari su di essi costruiti.  Quando ci si è accorti che non era così, e i prezzi degli immobili sono crollati………  LA BOLLA SCOPPIA

63 Chapter Eighteen63  La produzione totale è determinata da:  La quantità di lavoro e capitale impiegata nel processo produttivo aggregato  La produttività totale dei fattori  Imprese perfettamente concorrenziali acquistano input fino al punto in cui i loro prodotti marginali uguagliano i prezzi di mercato dei fattori.  I mercati dei fattori sono in equilibrio e la produzione aggregata è quella di “pieno impiego delle risorse” Cosa abbiamo fatto

64 Chapter Eighteen64  In economia chiusa, gli utilizzi della produzione sono:  Consumo aggregato  Investmenti aggregati  Spesa pubblica in acquisto di beni e servizi  Il tasso di interesse reale si aggiusta in modo da uguagliare la domanda e l’offerta di:  Beni e servizi  Fondi mutuabili Cosa abbiamo fatto

65 Chapter Eighteen65 Cosa abbiamo fatto  Una diminuzione del risparmio nazionale (pubblico o privato) provoca un aumento del tasso di interesse e una diminuzione degli investimenti.  Il ruolo, il funzionamento e la regolamentazione dei mercati finanziari sono stati alla base della Grande Crisi scoppiata nell’agosto del 2007 e che oggi, sotto diverse forme, ancora continua.

66 Chapter Eighteen66 Factors of production Production function Constant returns to scale Factor prices Competition Marginal product of labor (MPL) Diminishing marginal product Real wage Marginal product of capital (MPK) Real rental price of capital Economic profit versus accounting profit Cobb–Douglas production function Disposable income Consumption function Marginal propensity to consume Interest rate Nominal interest rate Real interest rate National saving (saving) Private saving Public saving Loanable funds Crowding out


Scaricare ppt "Chapter Eighteen1 CHAPTER 3 Distribution of national income A PowerPoint  Tutorial To Accompany MACROECONOMICS, 7th. ed. N. Gregory Mankiw Tutorial written."

Presentazioni simili


Annunci Google