La presentazione è in caricamento. Aspetta per favore

La presentazione è in caricamento. Aspetta per favore

Click to start and view the presentation. a.multilingual processes that have variously contributed to the development of Early Modern English drama through.

Presentazioni simili


Presentazione sul tema: "Click to start and view the presentation. a.multilingual processes that have variously contributed to the development of Early Modern English drama through."— Transcript della presentazione:

1 Click to start and view the presentation

2 a.multilingual processes that have variously contributed to the development of Early Modern English drama through Shakespeare; b.the specificity of various narrative elements when they have been adjusted to mimetic genres; c.the relevance and meaning of this translation in the construction of a shared European patrimony; d.our own perception of this patrimony as precisely European.

3 SEN S Shakespeare European Narrative Sources SCS Shakespeare Classical Sources SKENÈ. Theatre and Drama Studies

4

5

6 Technical details: the texts will be collected in a MySql database; the interface will use the AJAX technology, which allows to upload data on request; the site will be linked at our skenejournal.it page; the mark-up will be carried out according to TEI guidelines.

7 The project has been divided into several phases: ①Textual elaboration and construction of a corpus of interlinked texts according to pre-set research paths; ①Elaboration of a software for advancing individual research: i. semantic computational approach including the following searching possibilities: a.names; b.collocations; c.similes (‘like’); d.oxymora (based on ‘x-antonym’ search); ii. and elaboration of advanced OCR for Roman and Gothic typefaces in different languages; ③Publication of digitized facsimiles.

8 PHASE 1 ①diplomatic editions; ②semi-diplomatic editions with emendation of mistakes and normalization of a few graphs (u/v; vv = w; ʃ= s; ß = ss); ③normalized critical editions; ④alignment of diplomatic and semi-diplomatic editions; ⑤uploading of critical editions; ⑥segmentation of the normalized editions [click on segmentation] ;segmentation ⑦identification of individual intertextual paths based on multilingual links of a semantic type (imagery, rhetorical figures etc.); ⑧commentary: a) philological (with links to the apparatus of variants); b) semantic; c) critical. [click on the blue arrow]

9

10

11 Da Porto Bandello Brooke Boaistuau Painter Shakespeare

12 PARATEXTSTEXTSEDITIONSGLOSSARIESOTHER TEXTSCONTEXTS Da Porto Bandello Boaistuau Brooke Painter Shakespeare Da Porto Bandello Boaistuau Brooke Painter Shakespeare Da Porto Bandello Boaistuau Brooke Painter Shakespeare Da Porto Bandello Boaistuau Brooke Painter Shakespeare Da Porto Bandello Boaistuau Brooke Painter Shakespeare Da Porto Bandello Boaistuau Brooke Painter Shakespeare A custom built glossary for each text … A custom built glossary for each text … Dante Masuccio Cinzio Groto Ber. Gar. Dante Masuccio Cinzio Groto Ber. Gar. Coeval texts and treatises on: duels medicine … Coeval texts and treatises on: duels medicine … Titles, prefaces, arguments, etc. of modernized editions with a repertory of variants. Modernized version of each text which will be segmented and will include marked up correspondences to : fabula, plot, and thematic, lexematic, rhetorical, metaphorical relations in each elected segment. 1) diplomatic and semi–diplomatic editions (downloadable) 2) aligned diplomatic editions 3) aligned semi– diplomatic editions 1) diplomatic and semi–diplomatic editions (downloadable) 2) aligned diplomatic editions 3) aligned semi– diplomatic editions Semi–diplomatic ed. Diplomatic edition Semi–diplomatic ed. Diplomatic edition Da Porto see example: click HERE see example: click HERE EXAMPLE 1535 Semi–diplomatic ed. Diplomatic edition

13 SEGMENTATION ROMEO. If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine, the gentler sin is this: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.95 JULIET. Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, Which mannerly devotion shows in this, For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch, And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss. ROMEO. Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?100 JULIET. Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer. ROMEO. O then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do; They pray; grant thou, lest faith turn to despair. JULIET. Saints do not move, though grant for prayers’ sake. ROMEO. Then move not while my prayer’s effect I take. [He kisses her] Thus from my lips, by thine, my sin is purged. JULIET. Then have my lips the sin that they have took. ROMEO. Sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urged! Give me my sin again.[He kisses her] JULIET. You kiss by th’ book. ROMEO. If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine, the gentler sin is this: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.95 JULIET. Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, Which mannerly devotion shows in this, For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch, And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kiss. ROMEO. Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?100 JULIET. Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer. ROMEO. O then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do; They pray; grant thou, lest faith turn to despair. JULIET. Saints do not move, though grant for prayers’ sake. ROMEO. Then move not while my prayer’s effect I take. [He kisses her] Thus from my lips, by thine, my sin is purged. JULIET. Then have my lips the sin that they have took. ROMEO. Sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urged! Give me my sin again.[He kisses her] JULIET. You kiss by th’ book. Segment Description: Romeo and Juliet meet (the shared sonnets and the kiss). Da Porto 9 10 Bandello Boaistuau Brooke Painter Segment Description: Romeo and Juliet meet (the shared sonnets and the kiss). Da Porto 9 10 Bandello Boaistuau Brooke Painter [click on 15.5]

14 Each segment will be also linked to a general ‘segmentation tree’: 15. Romeo and Juliet meet at the feast [14]: link to the corresponding FABULA segment 15.1 Capulet welcomes the guests Capulet talks with his cousin Romeo sees Juliet Tybalt recognises Romeo and quarrels with Capulet over him Romeo and Juliet meet (the shared sonnets and the kiss) The Nurses interrupts Romeo and Juliet. Romeo discovers who Juliet is Benvolio urges his friends to go away and they say goodbye to Capulet Juliet discovers who Romeo is. Each segment will be also linked to a general ‘segmentation tree’: 15. Romeo and Juliet meet at the feast [14]: link to the corresponding FABULA segment 15.1 Capulet welcomes the guests Capulet talks with his cousin Romeo sees Juliet Tybalt recognises Romeo and quarrels with Capulet over him Romeo and Juliet meet (the shared sonnets and the kiss) The Nurses interrupts Romeo and Juliet. Romeo discovers who Juliet is Benvolio urges his friends to go away and they say goodbye to Capulet Juliet discovers who Romeo is.

15 R&J 17.9 (Shakespeare) Juliet asks Romeo to marry her and promises to send him somebody the following day. Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed. If that thy bent of love be honorable, Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow, By one that I’ll procure to come to thee, Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite, And all my fortunes at thy foot I’ll lay And follow thee my lord throughout the world R&J 17.9 (Shakespeare) Juliet asks Romeo to marry her and promises to send him somebody the following day. Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed. If that thy bent of love be honorable, Thy purpose marriage, send me word tomorrow, By one that I’ll procure to come to thee, Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite, And all my fortunes at thy foot I’ll lay And follow thee my lord throughout the world DP 17 (Da Porto) Giulietta rebukes Romeo for being so foward and declares she is ready to marry him in order to stop his calndestine visits. Allora la bella giovane quasi sdegnando disse. Romeo io tanto vi amo; quanto si possa persona lecitamente amare, & più vi conciedo di quello, che alla mia onestà si converria: & ciò faccio d’amore col valor vostro uinta. Ma se voi pensaste o per longo vagheggiarmi, o per altro modo più oltra come innamorato dell’Amor mio godere, questo pensier lasciate da parte, che alla fine in tutto vano lo trovarete. E per non tenervi più ne’ pericoli, ne’ quali veggio essere la vita vostra venendo ogni notte per queste contrade, vi dico che quando a voi piaccia di accettarmi per vostra donna, che io son pronta a darmi tutta: con voi in ogni luogo che vi sia in piacere, senza alcun rispetto venire.con voi in ogni luogo che vi sia in piacere, senza alcun rispetto venire DP 17 (Da Porto) Giulietta rebukes Romeo for being so foward and declares she is ready to marry him in order to stop his calndestine visits. Allora la bella giovane quasi sdegnando disse. Romeo io tanto vi amo; quanto si possa persona lecitamente amare, & più vi conciedo di quello, che alla mia onestà si converria: & ciò faccio d’amore col valor vostro uinta. Ma se voi pensaste o per longo vagheggiarmi, o per altro modo più oltra come innamorato dell’Amor mio godere, questo pensier lasciate da parte, che alla fine in tutto vano lo trovarete. E per non tenervi più ne’ pericoli, ne’ quali veggio essere la vita vostra venendo ogni notte per queste contrade, vi dico che quando a voi piaccia di accettarmi per vostra donna, che io son pronta a darmi tutta: con voi in ogni luogo che vi sia in piacere, senza alcun rispetto venire.con voi in ogni luogo che vi sia in piacere, senza alcun rispetto venire BAN 35 (Bandello) Giulietta refuses with animosity and suggests, instead, that he marries her «Romeo, voi sapete l’amor vostro ed io so il mio, e so che v’amo quanto si possa persona amare, e forse piú di quello che all’onor mio si conviene. Ma ben vi dico che, se voi pensate di me godere oltra il convenevole nodo del matrimonio, voi vivete in grandissimo errore e meco punto non sarete d’accordio. E perché conosco che praticando voi troppo sovente per questa vicinanza potreste di leggero incappare negli spiriti maligni 1 ed io non sarei piú lieta giá mai, ma conchiudo che, se voi desiderate esser cosí mio come io eternamente bramo esser vostra, che debbiate per moglie vostra legitima sposarmi. Se mi sposarete, io sempre sarò presta a venir in ogni parte ove piú a grado vi fia... ».sarò presta a venir in ogni parte ove piú a grado vi fia BAN 35 (Bandello) Giulietta refuses with animosity and suggests, instead, that he marries her «Romeo, voi sapete l’amor vostro ed io so il mio, e so che v’amo quanto si possa persona amare, e forse piú di quello che all’onor mio si conviene. Ma ben vi dico che, se voi pensate di me godere oltra il convenevole nodo del matrimonio, voi vivete in grandissimo errore e meco punto non sarete d’accordio. E perché conosco che praticando voi troppo sovente per questa vicinanza potreste di leggero incappare negli spiriti maligni 1 ed io non sarei piú lieta giá mai, ma conchiudo che, se voi desiderate esser cosí mio come io eternamente bramo esser vostra, che debbiate per moglie vostra legitima sposarmi. Se mi sposarete, io sempre sarò presta a venir in ogni parte ove piú a grado vi fia... ».sarò presta a venir in ogni parte ove piú a grado vi fia Note to additional comments, further correspondences to other texts, etc.

16 perché trattasi la maschera, come ogni altro faceva, e in abito di ninfa trovandosi, non fu occhio che a rimirarlo non volgesse, sì per la sua bellezza, che quella d’ogni donna avanzava che ivi fosse {agguagliava}, come per meraviglia che in quella casa massimamente la notte fosse venuto. Luigi Da Porto, Historia Novellamente Ritrovata di due nobili Amanti perche trattasi la maschera: come ogni altro facea: e in habito di ninpha troandosi: non fu oc- chio ch’a rimirarlo non volgesse: si per la sua bellezza: che quella d’ogni donna avan- zava: che ivi fosse: agguagliava: come per maraviglia che in quella casa: massi- mamente la notte: fosse venuto perche trattasi la maschera: come ogni altro facea: e in habito di ninpha troandosi: non fu oc- chio ch’a rimirarlo non volgesse: si per la sua bellezza: che quella d’ogni donna avan- zava: che ivi fosse: agguagliava: come per maraviglia che in quella casa: massi- mamente la notte: fosse venuto perche trattasi la maschera: come ogn’al- tro facea: e in habito di nimpha trovando- si: non fu occhio ch’a rimirarlo non volges- se si per la sua bellezza: che quella d’ogni don- na avanzava: che ivi fosse: agguagliava: co- me per maraviglia che in quella casa: massi- mamente la notte: fosse venuto: perche trattasi la maschera: come ogn’al- tro facea: e in habito di nimpha trovando- si: non fu occhio ch’a rimirarlo non volges- se si per la sua bellezza: che quella d’ogni don- na avanzava: che ivi fosse: agguagliava: co- me per maraviglia che in quella casa: massi- mamente la notte: fosse venuto: Era costui giovane molto, et bellissimo, et grande della persona, leggiadro et accostumato assai: perché trattasi la Maschera, come ogni altro faceva, et in habito di donna trovandosi, non fu quivi occhio, che a rimirarlo non si ri- volgesse, si per la sua bellezza; che quella di qualunque bella donna, che quivi fosse aguagliava; et si per maravi- glia, che in quella casa (massimamente la notte) venuto fos- se. Era costui giovane molto, et bellissimo, et grande della persona, leggiadro et accostumato assai: perché trattasi la Maschera, come ogni altro faceva, et in habito di donna trovandosi, non fu quivi occhio, che a rimirarlo non si ri- volgesse, si per la sua bellezza; che quella di qualunque bella donna, che quivi fosse aguagliava; et si per maravi- glia, che in quella casa (massimamente la notte) venuto fos- se

17 Costui, preso alquanto d’ardire, seguì: - Se io a voi con la mia mano la vostra riscaldo, voi con i begli occhi il mio cuore accendete.- La donna dopo un breve sorriso, schifando d’essere con lui veduta o udita ragionare, ancora gli disse: - Io vi giuro, Romeo, per mia fede, che non è qui donna, la quale come voi siete agli occhi miei bella paia.- Alla quale il giovane, già tutto di lei acceso, rispose: - Qual io mi sia sarò alla vostra beltà, s’a quella non spiacerà, fedele servo.-

18 Bandello (6) il più bello e cortese di tutta la gioventú di Verona. Boaistuau (5) le plus beau et mieux accompli gentilhomme qui fut en toute la jeunessede Veronne Brooke (6) as yet, no manlike beard there grew, Whose beauty and whose shape so far the rest did stain, That from the chief of Verona youth he greatest fame did gain, as yet, no manlike beard there grew, Whose beauty and whose shape so far the rest did stain, That from the chief of Verona youth he greatest fame did gain, Painter (5) the fairest and best conditioned gentleman that was amongst the Veronian youth,

19 Miss Ellen Tree (1837)

20 Charlotte and Susan Cushman as Romeo and Juliet. From a drawing by Margaret Gilles (1846)

21 Oh sweet Juliet, Thy beauty hath made me effeminate (Romeo and Juliet, ) Art thou a man? Thy form cries out thou art. Thy tears are womanish; thy wild acts denote The unreasonable fury of a beast. Unseemly woman in a seeming man, An ill-beseeming beast in seeming both. (Romeo and Juliet, ) “Art thou,” quoth he, “a man? Thy shape saith, so thou art; Thy crying, and thy weeping eyes denote a woman’s heart. For manly reason is quite from off thy mind outchased, And in her stead affections lewd and fancies highly placed: So that I stood in doubt, this hour, at the least, If thou a man or woman wert, or else a brutish beast. (Brooke, Romeus and Juliet, )

22 y Thank you y

23 ALIGNED EDITIONS (e.g. Romeo and Juliet Q1, Q2, and F) ALIGNED EDITIONS (e.g. Romeo and Juliet Q1, Q2, and F)

24 Capulet. But saying o’re what I have said before, My child is yet a stranger in the world, She hath not seen the change of fourteen years, Let two more summers wither in their pride, Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride. Capulet. But saying o’re what I have said before, My child is yet a stranger in the world, She hath not seen the change of fourteen years, Let two more summers wither in their pride, Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride. Romeo and Juliet ( ) Q2 critical edition with variants from Q1: Romeo and Juliet ( ) Q2 critical edition with variants from Q1: Q1] not yet attainde to Q1] fit Q1] daughter is a stranger [click on the blue arrow]


Scaricare ppt "Click to start and view the presentation. a.multilingual processes that have variously contributed to the development of Early Modern English drama through."

Presentazioni simili


Annunci Google